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Change the Exchange 2007 or Exchange 2010 Send Connector Port

by on Oct.19, 2011, under Email, Microsoft Exchange

It is common for Internet Service Providers to periodically block SMTP connections to third party hosts. The best way to correct this solution is to use a port other than port 25 that requires authentication.

  1. First open the Exchange Management Shell
  2. Run the following command to find out what your current port is for your connector(s): Get-SendConnector | ft Id*,Sm*s,po*
  3. Change the port to an alternative port supplied by your Smart Host provider (more than likely 465 or 587, I recommend using the TLS port which is 587) by running this command: Set-SendConnector “Send Connector Identity” -port 465.  You will of course change your send connector identity and port to match your configuration.
You may wish to confirm your configuration is correct with your Smart Host:
  1. In the Exchange Management Console, expand the Organization Configuration, select the Send Connectors tab, and double-click on your connector.  Select the Network tab and click the Change… button.  Confirm you are using Basic Authentication over TLS (if relevant to your configuration and port number) with the correct username and password.
If you have items in the delayed delivery queue, do the following:
  1. In the Exchange Manage Console, click on the Toolbox menu item
  2. Double-click on Queue Viewer and under the Queues tab, right-click on your delayed queue and select Retry.
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View Mail Headers in Outlook 2007

by on Nov.25, 2008, under Email, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Outlook 2007, Spam

Extracting an email header can be useful in tracking email issues, locating spammers, and reporting spam.

To view your header, do the following:

  1. Locate the message in your inbox and right-click on it.
  2. Select Message Options from the menu
  3. Copy the text in the Internet Headers window.  This will not include the email message, just the header.
  4. Paste the information into an email or document for analysis.  If you wish to paste the information into an email, you will need to close the options dialogue first.
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Reporting Spam

by on Nov.23, 2008, under Email, Spam

We would like to begin by stating that you should NEVER reply to a spam message, attempt to use the “unsubscribe” link in an unsolicited email message, or click on any links in the email.  You should also not download any images or files embedded in the email message.  By downloading the content or clicking on any links, spammers may detect that your email address is active and either send additional messages or sell your address to other spammers.

By reporting spam, you are taking an active effort to shut down the businesses behind the spam and remove a problem the impacts everyone.  If you receive spam that you would like to report, you have a few options:

  1. Look at the email message’s header to locate the true source of the spam and email the spammer’s ISP’s “abuse” address directly.  Generally we do not recommend doing this since the service providers supporting spam operations will either ignore the complaint or they may actually supply your address to the spammers themselves.  You can use the Network Abuse Clearing House to look up abuse contact addresses.
  2. Use a third party to submit spam complaints and supply the spammer’s information to spam feeds and realtime block list services.  We often use and recommend signing up for a free account at SpamCop, since they allow you to report violators.
  3. Report the spam to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) for inclusion into their spam database. The FTC and its law enforcement partners use the database to pursue cases against spam operations.

If you have been a victim of a computer or Internet related crime, such as fraud or indentity/financial theft, you can find help at the following places:

  1. Contact your local police department and ask for assistance with a cyber crime.
  2. File a complaint with the Internet Crime Complaint Center
  3. Contact any of the financial institutions or service providers involved in the incident
  4. Review the information and resources provided by the United States Secret Service’s Financial Crimes Division.

If you are careful and use the right software/services, you can avoid many of the problems surrounding spam, phishing scams, viruses, and spyware.

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View Mail Headers in Outlook 97, Outlook 98, Outlook 2000, Outlook 2003

by on Nov.23, 2008, under Email, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Outlook 2003, Spam

Extracting an email header can be useful in tracking email issues, locating spammers, and reporting spam.  To find your email header, in Outlook versions 97 to 2003, you can use the following steps.  Please note, Microsoft Outlook 97 may require the Internet Mail Enhancement Patch to view any mail headers.

To view your header, do the following:

  1. Start Outlook
  2. Open the email message in a separate window by double clicking on the email in your Inbox
  3. In the new email window, click on the View menu and select Options
  4. Copy the text in the Internet Headers window.  This will not include the email message, just the header.
  5. Paste the information into an email or document for analysis.  If you wish to paste the information into an email, you may need to close the options dialogue first.
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